Motel Mingle Forums General Chit Chat Booking.com Legal terms & coditions Failure

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  • #6020

    chris

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      On the 13th December 2015 we received a Italian booking through Booking.com for the Xmas period, the Guests failed to show, the Credit card was in the name of the Guest, 2 months later the Bank retook the amount due to the individual not being Authorised to use the Card, On contacting Booking.com they produced the terms & conditions that the Booker agreed to, the Bank ignored this with the overriding comment, the booker was not Authorised to use the card, No more assistance from Booking.com & we have to bear the cost. On closer examination, any Partner, Spouse or Employee could use this even if someone had stayed & not just a No Show. Any booker agreeing to the legal terms & conditions used by Booking.com are therefore of no value, all that has to be stated that the person was not authorised to use the Card. Fortunately due to our location, we have a constant flow of bookings, we have stopped the “Preferred Partner” deal & returned to the 12% Commission from the 15%, this will reduced or Commission costs by between $700.00 to $900.00 per Month. The Australian Dollar has certainly provided a big increase in overseas Guests, the Trivago & Hotels Combined TV ads have caused our own Web Site to drop from 28% to 8% with the domestic market, with the missing 20% using Trivago or Hotels Combined.

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      • #6821

        BusybeesBusybees

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        • Topics Started 22
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          Taken from the Accomm news today.

          The tiny mouse that roared!

          David McCall Sunday, August 21, 2016 News In Brief
          For more than twelve months, motels and hotels alike that use a virtual credit card system (VCC) for collecting monies from guests for prepaid bookings, have faced anguish with online travel agents (OTAs) advertising mixed messages.

          OTAs have continually splashed messages of ‘no deposits’, ‘nothing to pay until arrival’ and ‘no credit card fees’ on their websites, making guests and moteliers frustrated with OTAs promoting ‘easy to use’ booking systems with misinformation for guests. In some cases, OTAs have allowed motels to state that monies may be taken at time of booking and that booking fees apply, but if the enthusiastic guest doesn’t scroll down further on the page, the message is never seen. To add to this, there are some OTAs that won’t allow the motelier to even state that they use the VCC system, which creates even more back lashes with guests, often resulting in cancelling the booking.

          On a recent visit to Hong Kong, David McCall from Arra Accommodation Group (Budget Motels) met with directors at a Booking.com conference and raised the above issues that his members were constantly dealing with. He pointed out that these problems would be right across the board with other motel/hotel groups in Australia using the VCC system as well.

          David McCall’s concerns were met with reassurance that a clearer message for Oceania properties using the VCC system would be rectified and corrected very soon. David McCall said that the best way to forge ahead with the large OTAs was to build stronger relationships and work with them, rather than against them. He welcomed the news that Booking.com would assist his Chain and looked forward to seeing other OTAs following suit in the very near future.”

          • #6865

            flashlight

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            • Replies 15

              This apparent agreement between the OTA’s and the ACCC is a farce as it doesn’t really change anything. Providers still have to provide full online price parity and we cannot publish lower prices. This is effectively price setting condoned by the ACCC.

              If an OTA increases their commission we should be able to increase their buying price of our accommodation to compensate. This would result in true competition between OTA’s – increased commissions would mean increased selling prices compared to their opposition!

          • #6818

            howie

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            • Topics Started 3
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              This from booking.com this morning

              Good Morning,

              First, let me thank you for your trust in Booking.com and the business we do together. We appreciate our partnership and what you do for our mutual guests every single day.

              I would like to personally inform you of the outcome of a recent agreement reached between the Australian Competition and Consumer Authority (“ACCC”) and Booking.com, whereas Booking.com has agreed to extend the commitments it has rolled out in the European Union to all accommodations in Australia (the “Undertaking”).

              Please accept this email as an introduction to the Undertaking as well as confirmation and assurance of how we intend to continue to do business together going forward. You will also receive official notification and further detail via mail in the coming weeks.

              Here is a summary outlining the changes relevant to you pursuant to the Undertaking;

              1. You may set different room rates and offer different conditions and availability on different Online Travel Agents – This means you don’t have to offer the same room rates, conditions and availability on Booking.com as other OTAs. This gives you greater flexibility to manage your offering across distribution channels.

              2. You may offer lower rates or better conditions through offline channels (such as telephone bookings and walk-ins) provided you do not publish or market offline rates online – We have had feedback that our partners want the ability to discount through offline reservation channels without having to give us the same or better rates. From now on, we will not require the same or better rates in respect of rooms sold via offline channels, provided that you do not market those offline rates online (e.g. on your website or on meta-search sites).

              3. There is no restriction on the unpublished room rates or conditions you may offer, provided you do not market those rates online – We understand it may be important for you to offer special rates to your loyal customers through non-public channels (such as closed-user groups) or to negotiate special rates on a bilateral basis (e.g. a special private group discount). Through the Undertaking we have clarified this position.

              4. Parity with your own direct online channels and some availability – Going forward under the amended provisions, you are still contracted to give Booking.com parity in respect of room rates and conditions offered on your own website (which includes meta-search sites such as Trivago, Kayak, TripAdvisor or Google Hotel Finder when they redirect the consumer to your own website for booking). As set out above, we no longer require you to give us the same availability as our competitors, but in order to give meaning to our relationship, we require at least some availability in respect of all rooms and room-rate types.

              No specific action is required from you. Should you have any questions about this letter, please do not hesitate to reach out to us via the Inbox section of your extranet. Thank you for your continued support and partnership.

              So much for the competition watchdog, we will be putting up a sign in our reception to alert customers that they are paying 12% extra to book with this mob , as opposed to booking direct with us over the phone.
              I would suggest that booking.com will start going through all websites now to compare rates and taking down those that don`t comply.
              It may not make much difference to the current bookings but if enough motels do something similar or have something like this added to there website the word will get around.

              Any thoughts on this and suggestions how to combat it ?

            • #6566

              Applegum

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              • Topics Started 2
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                This was sent to us through GuestChek.com. It may be worth while getting onboard with the loss you have suffered.

                IMPORTANT NOTICE TO ALL HOTELIERS Dear Hoteliers, If you have experienced unfair, misconduct or losses as a result of Booking.coms business practices, please email legal.exc@sleepovers.com.au a very brief outline of what you have endured. Issues that have been raised to date 1. Booking.com do not have an API, payment gateway or appropriate process for ensuring credit cards are not fraudulent or stolen. 2. Booking.com are misleading guests/customers that payment for their booking has been taken. 3. Booking.com is restricting venues from selling nights, as they may be blocked despite that the guest/customer has not actually paid, for a minimum of 3 days. 4. Potentially causing losses for not permitting venues to cancel guest reservations immediately when credit cards are not approved. 5. Booking.coms contract is nugatory as it doesnt apply to AUS and NZ legislation, and inter alia is not executed by the venue. Our Legal Division are now compiling a brief to Booking.coms legal counsel by 1 July 2016, so please have your submissions in as soon as possible.

              • #6093

                BusybeesBusybees

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                • Topics Started 22
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                  Good morning,

                  Not quite the same “legal terms and conditions” with our “friend” booking.com. but they have changed the wording on our “special conditions” without our knowledge let alone our consent! It used to say “100% of the total booking will be charged anytime after booking” (which actually wanted to say ON booking but that wasn’t approved!)
                  Now it says “100% of the first night will be taken at least one day prior to arrival”
                  oh i love booking.com so much…. NOT

                  I know they are a necessary evil but!

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